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27% of Consumers Spend Most on their Partners, While 9% Spend Most on Themselves

New study looks at holiday spending trends, who people buy gifts for.

A holiday survey from BadCredit.org also reports that one-third admit they don’t spend the same amount on their partner as their partner spends on them.

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA, UNITED STATES, November 9, 2023 /EINPresswire.com/ — BadCredit.org, a website that enables Americans to make better credit decisions for a brighter financial future, today released the results of its 2023 Holiday Spending Survey. The survey looked at holiday spending to see where consumers tend to spend the most money, and on whom.

How Holiday Gift Budgets Are Distributed

When consumers in our survey were asked how they allocate their holiday spending among family and friends, many survey respondents said they will spend the most money during the holiday on their spouse/partner (27%), closely followed by:

• Children (26%)

• Siblings (15%)

• Parents/guardians (11%)

• Friends (11%)

• Themselves (9%)

12% of People Still Buy Gifts for Their Exes

About half (52%) of respondents said they will spend a different amount on gifts for their parents than they plan to spend on their in-laws, 77% of whom say that is intentional. The survey also found that 42% of respondents do not plan to buy gifts outside of friends and family, but most people said they plan to buy gifts for a variety of acquaintances, including:

• In-laws (26%)

• Neighbors (25%)

• Colleagues (23%)

• Bosses (15%)

• Teachers (12%)

• Ex-partners (12%)

Three Quarters of Children Will Receive What’s on Their Christmas Wish List

Nearly three-quarters of Americans with children in their household (73%) said they will buy what’s on their children’s holiday wish lists, with men (81%) more inclined than women (61%) to purchase what children ask for. Twenty-one percent of respondents said they sometimes purchase what’s on their child’s holiday wish list, while 5.5% said they do not.

There’s No Shame in Spending Less

You may think people feel bad if they don’t buy something significant for their loved ones. But the holiday spending survey discovered that almost half of Americans (47%) surveyed admitted they do not feel guilty if someone gives them a more expensive gift than the one they gifted them. Additionally, 32% of respondents admitted that they don’t spend the same amount on their partner as their partner spends on them.

“Whether holiday gift-givers are spending more or less than in years past, it’s important that they shop responsibly to avoid creating debt they’re unable to repay in a timely manner,” said Ashley Fricker, senior editor at BadCredit.org. “To ensure January comes with a financial bright side, holiday shoppers will want to create holiday budgets, make their gift lists and stick to them, and set some debt-free goals for the New Year.”

Methodology: A national online survey of 1,036 U.S. consumers, ages 18 and older, was conducted by Propeller Insights on behalf of BadCredit.org in October of 2023. Survey responses were nationally representative of the U.S. population for age, gender, region, and ethnicity. The maximum margin of sampling error was +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.

About BadCredit.org: Created to inform and educate Americans with bad credit, the website enables better credit decisions and a brighter financial future. BadCredit.org has informed and educated millions of Americans with bad credit ratings. As the top resource in the subprime finance market, the site receives nearly 1 million monthly pageviews and is the only site serving the full informational needs of subprime consumers, who make up 26% of the personal finance marketplace.

Brent Shelton
BadCredit.org
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Originally published at https://www.einpresswire.com/article/667229867/holiday-spending-trends-27-of-consumers-spend-most-on-their-partners-while-9-spend-most-on-themselves